An American’s Experience with German Public Healthcare

When I began my master’s studies in Germany, I also enrolled in German public healthcare. At that time, I wrote a (somewhat naive) blog post about my first experience with German public healthcare. This is an update to that post. Since I was a student at the time, I was only paying the student rate for public healthcare (about 80€ per month). Since I also have a chronic disease, I was taking much more out of the public healthcare system than I was putting in. While most German-taxpayers were compassionate and understanding of my situation, I did piss a few Continue Reading

Finding a Full-Time Job in Germany (a Foreigner’s Experience)

Hey guys, guess what…. I OFFICIALLY HAVE A BIG GIRL FULL-TIME POST-GRADUATION JOB!!! pic.twitter.com/F3eZAA0zJE — Courtney (@courtneydmartin) March 24, 2017 That’s right, after graduating with my Master’s degree from a German university in December 2016, I finally found a full-time job in my field! In fact, today is my first day at my new job (wish me luck!). Wanting to be as real with my readers as possible, this post will review my experience with applying to and interviewing for full-time jobs in Germany. First, the hard facts:Length of my job search: 3 monthsNumber of jobs I applied to: 24Number Continue Reading

Renewing a US Passport in Germany

Rain is wet. Fire is hot. Passports expire.  I had to renew my American passport this year, and since I live in Germany, I had the option of traveling to one of the three locations in Germany: the U.S. Embassy in Berlin, the Consulate General in Frankfurt, the Consulate General in Munich, or the Consular Agency in Bremen. [Note: US citizens over 16 years old with an undamaged passport that was issued within the last 15 years are able to renew their US passports via mail. However, you have to pay the fee via check in USD or the credit Continue Reading

Job Search Visa for Foreign Graduates in Germany

Whether you are considering getting your degree in Germany, you are currently getting your degree in Germany, or you are just about to graduate, then you have probably wondered: What comes next? Good news! Foreigners who receive a degree from a German university are allowed to stay in the country after graduation in order to to work. However, if you are not lucky enough to have a job lined up directly after graduation, and your student visa is running out at the end of the semester, then you are eligible for the job search visa (Aufenthaltserlaubnich zur Arbeitsplatzsuche). To understand Continue Reading

A Month of German Bureaucracy

I had four appointments at the Bürgeramt in the month of September. Yes, you read that correctly: four appointments in four weeks. Here’s a review of each of those appointments, just to give you an idea of how amazingly thorough (and sometimes redundant) German bureaucracy is for us foreigners. Appointment #1: Ausländerbehörde My student visa was going to run out on September 30th. However, due to other bureaucratic circumstances, I had to enroll for another semester at my university. So, I needed to renew my student visa for at least 6 more months. When I made this appointment per email, Continue Reading

Cashing Checks in Germany vs. USA

No matter how long you live abroad, you still come across little everyday things that will surprise you. Things that you know would be so simple in your home country, but are confusing, over-complicated, or even archaic in our host country. Today, I am talking about cashing and depositing checks in Germany versus the USA. As I already bragged about multiple times on my blog, I won an academic prize from the DAAD in July, and this prize included a check for 1,000€. Desperately needing the money to pay for my upcoming semester, I took it to the bank the Continue Reading

On Paid Vacation

Unfortunately, my contract for the part-time job I have had for the past year came to an end. In fact, today was my very last day. I’m not too sad, though, because I will still be paid until the end of September. How? Germany! I have been working a part-time job at my university since October 2014. The job is great, the pay is great, everything is great. Learning that I had paid vacation days made it even more great. At just 15 hours per week, I never expected I would have any kind of benefits. Heck, I worked full-time Continue Reading