German Christmas Card Fail

This an apology to my family. I tried my best, but nobody will be receiving Christmas cards this year. Don’t blame me, blame the strict German postal service (see below). I was so good this year. I bought a pack of Christmas cards just days after Thanksgiving. They were even the kind where part of the profits go to charity. I addressed the envelopes to all of my friends and family in the U.S. I wrote personal messages in each of the Christmas cards. I even drove (well, Marco drove) to the post office just a few days into December Continue Reading

Then and Now

In November 2011, Marco took me on our first weekend getaway to the coast of the Baltic Sea near Lübeck. We stayed in a little beach house (albeit not directly on the beach), where we cuddled up in front of a wood fireplace and made a short day trip to the Lübeck Christmas market. Four years later, Marco planned another little getaway to the Baltic Sea. This time, we ventured a little further north to Kappeln, which is about 45 minutes south of Flensburg, and the house we stayed in really did sit right on the shore. In fact, we Continue Reading

My Annual Trip to the German Bakery

As much as I have integrated into German culture, there is one custom I do not regularly taken part in: buying bread from the bakery. Bakeries are a big part of traditional German culture, and I remember being shocked with how many bakeries there are (and how popular they are) when I first came to Germany in 2011. Unfortunately, I am not a big bread-eater, and heaven knows that I do not need more sweets and pastries in my life. So, I avoid bakeries. In fact, I have probably only bought something from a bakery about 10 times during my Continue Reading

German Apprenticeships (and why the USA needs them too)

Did you know that student loan debt is the second largest source of debt for Americans (mortgages are the #1)? Excuse my German, aber das ist für’n Arsch. I have student loans. In fact, I graduated with the average amount of student loan debt for someone with a Bachelor’s degree: $30,000. Luckily, this number is not increasing since college education is free in Germany. However, it is still waiting for me when I graduate and cannot keep it under deferral any longer. But what choice do Americans have? Due to the recent trend of “up-credentialing,” jobs that traditionally required only Continue Reading

Oh, the Difference One Letter Makes

I dressed up for Halloween this past weekend for the first time in at least 4 years. I was Little Red Riding Hood, and Marco was my wolf. Since Germans stick to scary costumes (luckily the “sexy” costume trend has not made it over here yet), I used liquid latex and fake blood to make scratches along the side of my face. We had to travel by train and subway to get to the Halloween party, and Marco had not yet put in his fangs and contacts. So, our friends kept commenting on how “cute” he looked, which is not Continue Reading

My Second Semester of Grad School in Germany

My third semester of grad school starts today (which is also my final semester of classes! YAY!). Unfortunately, I still have one more term paper to write from last semester (oops), but it will get done within the next two weeks (hopefully), so I figured I will write this post anyways. Here is a review of my second semester of graduate school in Germany. 7 grad school coursesIn order to graduate in 2 years, my program requires students to take 6 courses per semester. Why did I take 7? Masochism, basically. But I survived! 6 term papersThe good news: I didn’t Continue Reading

Sisterhood of the World Bloggers

Much like chain emails back in the early 2000’s, some bloggers like to send around “awards” to each other that come with a set of questions for their nominees to answer. I have never taken part in one of these awards yet, but after being nominated a handful of times, I figured it was time to participate 🙂 This particular award is called the “Sisterhood of the World Bloggers.” I was nominated by American Faultier, Confuzzledom, and Ami in Schwabenland. Each of them created ten questions, but since I am lazy, and 30 questions seem like it would be a lot for Continue Reading

Flying Kohlrabi | Mistranslation Monday

While in the U.S. last month, the German boyfriend saw his very first hummingbird! Hummingbirds only live in the Americas, so this was something he was quite excited about. Since my parents have a hummingbird feeder, we continued to watch a group of hummingbirds fly all over the backyard for our entire two-week stay. As we were watching the hummingbirds from my parent’s patio one morning, I tried to strike up a German conversation with Marco by saying the German word for hummingbird. “Kohlrabi!” I think this is what Marco imagined when I said that. After a confused pause, Marco Continue Reading

USA Haul #2

I came back from my two-week trip from the U.S. on Friday. So, naturally, I have another haul to share! Before I left, I shared my American shopping list, which mentioned some of things I had planned to pick up during my trip. Well, I got all those things and then some. Most importantly, I got clothes. As a graduate student that did her Bachelor’s in the U.S., I do not have very much money. So, I very rarely go shopping for new clothes. I actually cannot remember the last time I bought any new clothing in Germany. Since clothes Continue Reading

Colorful | Mistranslation Monday

–haft is a German adjective suffix. Examples of words with this suffix include dauerhaft (permanent; long-lasting), herzhaft (hearty), and grauenhaft (atrocious; morbid).  Today, however, I want to talk about the German word fabelhaft, which I always missheard as farbehaft. Fabelhaft means fabulous or mavelous. It comes from the word Fabel (fable). Add on the suffix –haft, and it becomes an adjective which basically means “like a fairy tale.” Silly me has always understood the word fabelhaft as farbehaft, which is not a real word. To me, however, it meant “colorful” (Farbe = color). I am pretty sure that I have been Continue Reading